IoT: Revolutionizing Business For The Little Guy

IoT Revolutionizing Business For The Little Guy

Daniel Newman

Patterns from the past show technology advancements tend to benefit big businesses, often eliminating the need for small businesses. It’s no wonder then, that small businesses have been historically averse to embracing expensive technology in the way big businesses do.

The Internet of Things, or IoT, is the exception to this norm. Being customizable and practical, the IoT is poised to revolutionize the way small businesses operate. In fact, 57 percent of small businesses think the IoT will have a significant effect on their bottom line, according to an AVG Survey. From everyday operations to tracking inventory, small businesses can take advantage of the versatility that the IoT provides to finally level the playing field with the big guys.

Simplicity of the IoT

One of the great things about the IoT is this new age in connectivity doesn’t propose unnecessarily complex, world-changing ideas. Rather, most of the innovations are arguably simple and possibly even mundane. For example, consider Valarm, a small business startup specializing in monitoring systems, figured out how to add sensors inexpensively to many different areas. Valarm added sensors to a client’s vineyard to detect freezes and cold temperatures (as this ruins the grapes). When the temperature drops, the sensors activate sprinklers that encase the grapes in ice, thereby protecting them. This is no novel idea, but a rather simple one stemming from the desire to protect grapes from the cold. All the same, the efficiency that comes with this simplicity is what enables the vineyard to compete with bigger vineyards that could potentially afford more sophisticated systems and employ a larger workforce.

In this way, the IoT can truly give small businesses an edge. There is one caveat, though: it needs to be implemented correctly. According to Drew Robb, speaking about to the success of IoT, “No doubt more than a few firms-big and small-will come out with some ridiculous-sounding applications. The point is to keep your IoT plan practical, useful, and affordable.”

Affordable option

As IoT becomes more popular, the cost of these systems is steadily decreasing making it an affordable alternative for most small businesses. In terms of day-to-day operations, Michael Feldman states that it’s “displacement of traditional systems could reduce operating expenses.” For example, small businesses can use IoT-based security alarm systems and other sensor-based systems such as IoT thermostats and air-conditioning systems to help control heat and electricity costs. Furthermore, the ability to connect more devices to the Internet allows for greater intelligence and streamlining the processes of daily operations.

Unlimited connection possibilities

In the small town of New Bedford, Massachusetts, folks over at Inex Advisors are using the IoT to change how traditional businesses run. From sensors that allow local fishermen to reduce their paperwork and follow compliance regulations to weather stations that enable local vintners to monitor their vines, the execution of IoT concepts shows the unlimited potential of connectivity.

Consider the example of Bigbelly, a company started by two students from Babson College and Olin College of Engineering. Bigbelly created solar-powered stations that look like garbage cans from the outside. Inside, however, they have trash compactors and sensors that detect the fullness of the can and send notifications when the can needs emptied. In this way, waste collectors are notified about which cans need emptying, saving time and energy on their collection routes. Bigbelly is another great example of how sensors can help monitor and track the simplest items, making something even as mundane as trash collecting more efficient.

Figuring out how the IoT can help a particular business or even an aspect of it is key, as the opportunities really are endless. Small businesses that choose not to embrace this technology will be left in the dust, unable to compete with bigger systems and even their small business peers who have decided to digitize.

Ultimately, Gartner vice president Jim Tully makes a very poignant point: “I think most people will be surprised at how invisible the technology is even when it is so pervasive. But the implications of IoT on every aspect of life will be profound.”

For more on how IoT technology is transforming business, see The Internet Of Things Transforms The Sum Of The Parts, Not Just The Whole. Photo Credit: Janitors Flickr via Compfight cc

Comments

About Daniel Newman

Daniel Newman serves as the Co-Founder and CEO of EC3, a quickly growing hosted IT and Communication service provider. Prior to this role Daniel has held several prominent leadership roles including serving as CEO of United Visual. Parent company to United Visual Systems, United Visual Productions, and United GlobalComm; a family of companies focused on Visual Communications and Audio Visual Technologies.
Daniel is also widely published and active in the Social Media Community. He is the Author of Amazon Best Selling Business Book “The Millennial CEO.” Daniel also Co-Founded the Global online Community 12 Most and was recognized by the Huffington Post as one of the 100 Business and Leadership Accounts to Follow on Twitter.
Newman is an Adjunct Professor of Management at North Central College. He attained his undergraduate degree in Marketing at Northern Illinois University and an Executive MBA from North Central College in Naperville, IL. Newman currently resides in Aurora, Illinois with his wife (Lisa) and his two daughters (Hailey 9, Avery 5).
A Chicago native all of his life, Newman is an avid golfer, a fitness fan, and a classically trained pianist

Will The Collaborative Economy Completely Reimagine Tomorrow’s Big Business?

Daniel Newman

Today, the largest car rental and hospitality companies are Uber and Airbnb, respectively. What do they have in common? Let’s see – neither of them own physical possessions associated with their service, and both have turned a non-performing asset into an incredible revenue source.

Don’t be surprised, because this is the new model for doing business. People want to rent instead of own, and at the same time, they want to monetize whatever they have in excess. This is the core of the sharing economy. The concept of earning money by sharing may have existed before, but not at such a large scale. From renting rooms to rides to clothes to parking spaces to just about anything else you can imagine, the sharing economy is rethinking how businesses are growing.

What’s driving the collaborative economy?

The sharing economy, or the collaborative economy, as it’s also called, is “an economic model where technologies enable people to get what they need from each other-rather than from centralized institutions,” explains Jeremiah Owyang, business analyst and founder of Crowd Companies, a collaborative economy platform. This means you could rent someone’s living room for a day or two, ride someone else’s bike for a couple of hours, or even take someone’s pet out for a walk-all for a rental fee.

Even a few years ago, this sort of a thing was unthinkable. When Airbnb launched in 2008, many people were skeptical, as the whole idea seemed not only irrational, but totally stupid. I mean, why would anyone want to spend the night in a stranger’s room and sleep on an air bed, right? Well, turns out many people did! Airbnb moved from spare rooms to luxury condos, villas, and even castles and private islands in more than 30,000 cities across 190 countries, and rentals reached a staggering 15 million plus last year.

What is driving this trend? Millennials definitely play a role. Their love for everything on-demand, plus their frugal mindset, makes them ideal for the sharing economy. But the sharing economy is attractive to consumers across a wide demographic, as it only makes sense.

How collaborative economy is reshaping the future of businesses

Until recently, collaborative-economy startups like Uber and Airbnb were looked upon as threats. Disuptors to any marketplace are usually threatening, so this isn’t surprising. Established businesses that were accustomed to the way things had always been did (and still do) rail against companies like Uber or AirBnB, yet consumers seem to love them. And that’s what matters. Uber has faced many harsh criticisms, yet it continues to provide more than a million rides a month.

We are living in an era of consumer-driven enterprise, where consumers are at the helm. Perhaps this is the biggest reason why the collaborative economy is here to stay. No matter what industry, companies are trying to bring customers to the fore. A collaborative business model allows customers to call the shots. A great example is the cloud, which relies on resource sharing and allows users to scale up or down according to their needs.

Today, traditional businesses are participating in a collaborative economy in different ways. Some are acquiring startups. General Motors, for example, invested $3 million to acquire RelayRides, a peer-to-peer car sharing service. Others are entering into partnerships like Marriott, which partnered with LiquidSpace, an online platform to book flexible workspaces. Other brands, like GE, BMW, Walgreens, and Pepsi are also stepping into the collaborative-economy space and holding the hands of startups instead of competing with them.

Changes in the workplace

Remote work and telecommuting has taken off as companies become more comfortable with the idea of people working outside their offices, and cloud technology is enabling that. Now, let’s look at the scenario from the lens of the sharing economy. With companies looking to find temporary resources that can meet the fast-changing demands of the business, freelancers could replace a large chunk of full-time professionals in future. Why? Because at the heart of this disruptive practice lies the concept of sharing human resources.

As companies set out to temporarily use the services of people to meet short- and medium-term goals, it’s going to completely change the way we build companies. Also, as we have seen through the growth of companies like Airbnb and Uber, it’s going to change the deliverables that companies provide. With demand changing and technology proliferating at breakneck speed, it’s not just important that businesses start to see and adopt this change; it’s imperative because companies that over-commit to any one thing will find themselves obsolete.

When it comes to workplaces, so much is happening today that it’s impossible to predict where things are ultimately headed. But one thing is for sure: The collaborative economy is not going anywhere as long as our priorities are built around better, faster, more efficient and cost-effective.

Want more insight on today’s sharing economy? see Collaborative Economy: It’s Real And It’s Disrupting Enterprises. This article was originally seen on Ricoh Blog. The post Will the Collaborative Economy Completely Reimagine Tomorrows Big Business appeared first on Millennial CEO. Photo Credit: Pedrolu33 via Compfight cc

Comments

About Daniel Newman

Daniel Newman serves as the Co-Founder and CEO of EC3, a quickly growing hosted IT and Communication service provider. Prior to this role Daniel has held several prominent leadership roles including serving as CEO of United Visual. Parent company to United Visual Systems, United Visual Productions, and United GlobalComm; a family of companies focused on Visual Communications and Audio Visual Technologies.
Daniel is also widely published and active in the Social Media Community. He is the Author of Amazon Best Selling Business Book “The Millennial CEO.” Daniel also Co-Founded the Global online Community 12 Most and was recognized by the Huffington Post as one of the 100 Business and Leadership Accounts to Follow on Twitter.
Newman is an Adjunct Professor of Management at North Central College. He attained his undergraduate degree in Marketing at Northern Illinois University and an Executive MBA from North Central College in Naperville, IL. Newman currently resides in Aurora, Illinois with his wife (Lisa) and his two daughters (Hailey 9, Avery 5).
A Chicago native all of his life, Newman is an avid golfer, a fitness fan, and a classically trained pianist

How One Business Approach Can Save The Environment – And Bring $4.5 Trillion To The World Economy

Shelly Dutton

Despite reports of a turbulent global economy, the World Bank delivered some great news recently. For the first time in history, extreme poverty (people living on less than $1.90 each day) worldwide is set to fall to below 10%. Considering that this rate has declined from 37.1% in 1990 to 9.6% in 2015, it is hopeful that one-third of the global population will participate the middle class by 2030.

For all industries, this growth will bring new challenges and pressures when meeting unprecedented demand in an environment of dwindling – if not already scarce – resources. First of all, gold, silver, indium, iridium, tungsten, and many other vital resources could be depleted in as little as five years. And because current manufacturing methods create massive waste, about 80% of $3.2 trillion material value is lost irrecoverably each year in the consumer products industry alone.

This new reality is forcing companies to rethink our current, linear “take-make-dispose” approach to designing, producing, delivering, and selling products and services. According to Dan Wellers, Digital Futures lead for SAP, “If the economy is not sustainable, we are in trouble. And in the case of the linear economy, it is not sustainable because it inherently wastes resources that are becoming scarce. Right now, most serious businesspeople think sustainability is in conflict with earning a profit and becoming wealthy. True sustainability, economic sustainability, is exactly the opposite. With this mindset, it becomes strategic to support practices that support a circular economy in the long run.”

The circular economy: Good for business, good for the environment

What if your business practices and operation can help save our planet? Would you do it? Now, what if I said that this one business approach could put $4.5 trillion up for grabs?

By taking a more restorative and regenerative approach, every company can redesign the future of the environment, the economy, and their overall business. “Made possible by the digital economy, forward-thinking businesses are choosing to embrace this value to intentionally reimagine the economy around how we use resources,” observed Wellers. “By slowing down the depletion of resources and possibly even rejuvenating them, early adopters of circular practices have created business models that are profitable, and therefore sustainable. And they are starting to scale.”

In addition to making good financial sense, there’s another reason the circular economy is a sound business practice: Your customers. In his blog 99 Mind-Blowing Ways the Digital Economy Is Changing the Future of Business, Vivek Bapat revealed that 68% of consumers are interested in companies that bring social and environmental change. More important, 84% of global consumers actively seek out socially and environmentally responsible brands and are willing to switch brands associated with those causes.

Five ways your business can take advantage of the circular economy

As the circular economy proves, business and economic growth does not need to happen at the cost of the environment and public health and safety.As everyone searches for an answer to job creation, economic development, and environmental safety, we are in an economic era primed for change.

Wellers states, “Thanks to the exponential growth and power of digital technology, circular business models are becoming profitable. As a result, businesses are scaling their wealth by investing in new economic growth strategies.”

What are these strategies? Here are five business models that can enable companies to unlock the economic benefits of the circular economy, as stated in Accenture’s report Circular Advantage: Innovative Business Models and Technologies that Create Value:

  1. Circular supplies: Deliver fully renewable, recyclable, and biodegradable resource inputs that underpin circular production and consumption systems.
  2. Recovery of resources: Eliminate material leakage and maximize the economic value of product return flows.
  3. Extension of product life: Extend the life cycle of products and assets. Regain the value of your resources by maintaining and improving them by repairing, upgrading, remanufacturing, or remarketing products.
  4. Sharing platforms: Promote a platform for collaboration among product users as individuals or organizations.
  5. Product as a service: Provide an alternative to the traditional model of “buy and own.” Allow products to be shared by many customers through a lease or pay-for-use arrangement.

To learn more about the circular economy, check out Dan Wellers’ blog “4 Ways The Digital Economy Is Circular.”

Comments

Next-Gen Batteries Will Define Our Future

Dan Wellers and Michael Rander

$480 million : venture investments in battery in first half of 2017

8 minutes : amount of time to charge Toyota’s experimental solid state battery

30,000 : number of homes to be powered by world’s largest lithium-ion battery array

200,000 : number of charges experimental gold nanowires can take without losing capacity

Link to SourcesNew Approaches to Energy Storage

Standard rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are made with cobalt. They’re small, light, and long-lasting, but they can’t store power at grid scale. Watch for these emerging alternatives:

  • Graphene, a one-atom-thick form of graphite, conducts energy faster and more efficiently than any other known material.
  • Sodium, in a form similar to table salt, is cheap and plentiful.
  • Sulphur and oxygen, combined with lithium, can each store two to three times more power than cobalt.
  • Solid state batteries contain no liquid, so could function in extreme temperatures.

A World Built on Batteries

Also at early stages of development are batteries 3-D printed from copper foam, a wearable nanofilm that captures energy from body motion, a phone that charges itself using ambient sound, and even an electric “supercar” that stores energy in its carbon nanotube body panels.

The energy storage revolution isn’t merely about charging your phone faster or extending the range of your electric car. It’s about enabling a society-wide transformation in which renewable energy can be generated sustainably, stored at scale, and distributed consistently and reliably at all hours, under all conditions. The batteries we develop today will create jobs, support circular business models, reduce pollution, and make the power grid more resilient. That will accelerate the shift to a post-fossil fuel economy while making the transition less disruptive.

Download the executive brief Next-Gen Batteries Will Define Our Future.

Read the full article How Future Batteries Could Save Civilization.

Comments

About Dan Wellers

Dan Wellers is founder and leader of Digital Futures at SAP, a strategic insights and thought leadership discipline that explores how digital technologies drive exponential change in business and society.

About Michael Rander

Michael Rander is the Global Research Director for Future Of Work at SAP. He is an experienced project manager, strategic and competitive market researcher, operations manager as well as an avid photographer, athlete, traveler and entrepreneur. Share your thoughts with Michael on Twitter @michaelrander.

Future Of Work 2018: 10 Predictions You Can’t Ignore

Steven Hunt

The start of winter is often referred to as the “holiday season.” But it might also be called the “prediction season.” When it comes to human capital management (HCM), most predictions tend to be variations of the same things.

A colleague and I even created a scale to rate HCM predictions based on whether they are new or just “old wine in new bottles.” The reason HCM predictions do not change much over time is because the “H” in HCM is about people. People do not evolve as fast as technology. Consequently, the basic challenges of HCM are constant: getting the right people in the right roles and providing them with the right work environments while complying with employment laws.

The following are my “top ten” predictions about how these will change in 2018.

Workforce agility will become the most critical concept in HCM. It is often said that the only constant is change. It is now more accurate to say the only constant is an ever-accelerating rate of change. The only way companies can survive in the modern economy is to excel at adapting to changing markets, technologies, and business landscapes. This requires tapping into people’s innate capacity for learning, growth, and innovation.

Staffing will reach new levels of complexity. For over 100 years, most people interpreted “staffing” to mean hiring employees to work onsite in full-time or part-time roles. This concept is changing due to shifting skill shortages, global labor pools, and a massive rise in virtual work and contract employment. Staffing no longer means hiring employees. It means finding the right mix of skills and matching them to business demands by tapping into an increasingly global, virtual, and contingent labor force. Companies will be forced to redefine workforce planning, recruiting, staffing, and management to work in this much more complex labor market.

The experience of work will greatly improve. Technology has made a lot of things about our lives much easier and more enjoyable. Finding our way around a city, buying products, staying in touch with our friends, watching movies, and hundreds of other life experiences have been transformed by social and mobile technologies leveraging artificially intelligent interfaces and machine learning algorithms. We will see exponential growth in the use of artificial intelligence, chatbots, intelligent services, machine learning, mobile solutions, and social platforms to make work more enjoyable, simple, and engaging.

Performance management will become a solution, not a problem. People have hated performance management for decades. This is changing thanks to companies rethinking performance management to focus on ongoing coaching and team based decision making. We will soon reach a tipping point where the dreaded annual review will be nothing more than a painful memory, having been replaced by mobile technology enabled continuous performance management solutions that employees and managers both appreciate and like.

Re-conceptualizing compensation. Companies spend billions of dollars each year on merit increases, bonuses, and other form of compensation. Yet few of them can confidently answer this question: “What is the return on investment you get from the money spent on compensation in terms of increased employee engagement, productivity, and retention?” Companies can tell down to the last penny how much is spent on compensation, but they cannot tell if that money is being spent wisely. The future of compensation will involve more continuous processes where employees receive different types of rewards throughout the year from different sources. And analytics will be used to link investments in compensation to returns in workforce productivity.

Intolerance of inequity. For too long, companies have viewed inequity as a problem, but not a problem worth solving. With the workforce becoming increasingly diverse, particularly the rise of women who now represent 50 percent or more of the employees in many fields, society is reaching a long-awaited tipping point where inequitable treatment based on non-job relevant factors such as gender, ethnicity, and age is being openly acknowledged and addressed. Smart companies will proactively redesign their talent management practices to ensure bias is identified and addressed before it happens.

The rise of well-being tech. People are not meant to live in an “always on” 24-7 world. The pace of work is literally burning people out. Companies need employees to be highly engaged, creative, and service oriented. But this is impossible to do if employees are tired, stressed, and distracted. In the coming year, companies will continue to make more well-being tools available to their employees. With the explosion of well-being technology at the consumer level, such as smartwatches and fitness technology, many employers will be looking to bring these tools into the workplace. However, successful organizations will be those who make such technologies accessible, enjoyable, and cultural for their employees.

Org charts will begin to phase out. There is a lot of talk about updating businesses for the digital age, and yet companies continue to manage work forces using a tool that has changed little since the Roman Empire: the hierarchical organization chart (“org chart”). Relying on org charts to guide workforce management decisions is both foolish and dangerous in a digitalized world. And while 2018 will not be “the year the org chart died,” some progressive organizations will begin to phase out traditional org charts for more modern, digital approaches.

Companies will ditch all-or-nothing retirement. 2018 will bring about a major shift in workplace dynamics with regards to older generations. Today, individuals are living longer, and thus working longer – past 60, 70, and even 80. Forward-thinking organizations realize the need to keep this skilled talent in their organization, particularly as many industries face increasing skills shortages. However, this transition will also force companies to rethink jobs; for example, many positions that used to be full time will become part time. In the coming year, organizations will begin to move away from the traditional, all-or-nothing view of retirement.

Growth in HR cybersecurity threats. Ransom ware made its main stage debut in 2017 with the WannaCry and NotPetya attacks. In 2018, ransom ware threats will continue to proliferate. HR systems have not historically been a major target of cyber criminals. Unfortunately, this will change. There will be a growing number of attacks against human resources departments, with cyber-criminals posing as potential applicants in the hopes of infecting the larger organization.

We should feel confident these trends will continue to evolve over the coming years. If there is one thing psychologists have proven over the years about predictions, it is that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior.

For more on technology and HR, see Why (And How) Technology Is Bringing HR And The CFO Together. This article originally appeared on Forbes SAPVoice.

Article published by Steven Hunt. It originally appeared on SAP and has been republished with permission.

Comments

About Steven Hunt

Steven Hunt is the Senior Vice President of Customer Value at SAP. He is responsible for guiding the strategy and deployment of knowledge, tools and process improvements that increase the value customers receive from SuccessFactors & SAP Cloud software as a service solutions.

Browse

Article by channel:

Read more articles tagged: Digital Transformation